BC Liberals

Pot reproaches kettle for looking black, again

What follows is an item first published here five years ago. I find it somewhat amusing to compare Christy Clark’s words before she became Premier to actions taken by Liberals after she became putative boss. Incidentally, both Beedie and Morgan continued to do well. There were only winners on the BC Liberal lists of big business supporters.


Ryan-Beedie_The-Beedie-Group_5_1 February 8, 2011:  Real estate heir Ryan Beedie announced he would encourage 20 other wealthy inheritors and tycoon strivers to complete thousands of Liberal memberships on behalf of Kevin Falcon. We don’t know yet if that includes or adds to names taken from employee lists, rosters of teenage hockey teams or veterinary practices. Perhaps Mr. Beedie and friends have been standing outside Safeway selling memberships or maybe they recruit while sipping Gold Rush cocktails at Opus Bar. One good thing about online voting is that new members don’t even have to attend a meeting. They can even have others vote on their behalf. That’s democracy, BC Liberal style.

Christy Clark worries about Kevin Falcon‘s ties to big business:

Clearly Kevin is not having any trouble stacking up lists of insiders, but I think what British Columbians, and BC Liberals want from government now is not a leader who can grant access to people who already have a lot of access…

d6411-potcallingthekettleblackMs. Clark, not to be outdone by Falcon’s ante of Beedie, a Fraser Institute director, wagered her own director of the think tank that inspires BC Liberal policies. Gwyn Morgan, also a director of the Manning Centre, is the former president and CEO of energy company EnCana Corp., one of North America’s largest natural gas producers. He is but one among a team of rich folks backing Clark, including Patrick Kinsella, consultant and advisor to both buyer and seller of BC Rail. It is safe to assume that Kinsella is not helping Clark to gain access for himself to the Liberal Party’s backroom. He is already the room’s proprietor.

At one time, by his own account the most powerful man in Canada’s oil patch, Morgan is now Chairman of the Board of SNC-Lavalin, a construction and engineering company adept in securing mega-contracts from governments. It is a familiar name in British Columbia, involved as builder and/or operator in billions of dollars worth of public projects including Sea to Sky Highway, Canada Line, Sky Train and the Bennett Bridge in Kelowna. Additionally, subsidiary Fraser River Pile & Dredge is Canada’s largest marine construction and dredging contractor with a very long history of securing profitable deals with governments.

Interesting that someone who spends much time courting politicians and taking back huge cheques drawn on the public purse, Morgan wrote this in the Globe and Mail:

. . . raising tax rates would be counterproductive and politically toxic. The only realistic option is to put the brakes on spending. But how? The obvious place to start is health care, every province’s biggest and fastest rising expense.

There you have the future with BC Liberals, whether it is Kevin Falcon or Christy Clark, they are servants of the super-rich, dedicated to the no-government/no taxes principles espoused by the Fraser Institute. They aim to eliminate public healthcare, education and vital activities such as environmental oversight and other forms of industrial and commercial regulation.

Morgan has had an admirable career. However, he has been criticized for working with the RCMP in staging a phony bombing of an abandoned gas-well shack owned by Alberta Energy Corporation, a precursor of EnCana. Police were building a case against anti-gas campaigner Wiebo Ludwig and used a tactic reminiscent of the force’s dirty tricks campaign against Quebec separatists in the 1970s.

EnCana has come under fire from several lobby groups, including Greenpeace and the David Suzuki Foundation, because of a $1.7-billion pipeline EnCana and its partners are building through an ecologically sensitive slice of Ecuador’s rainforest.  Morgan’s pitched battle, along with other industry executives, against the Kyoto accord has also put him at odds with many environmentalists.

A House of Commons committee rejected Stephen Harper’s nominee to head a review board for public appointments. The government operations committee called Gwyn Morgan unsuitable for the job. Committee member Peggy Nash reported on a speech Morgan gave in Toronto:

He said that refugees tended to be less qualified than economic immigrants. He questioned the role of multiculturalism.

It is not clear if that sentiment will go over well with tens of thousands of South Asians signed to new Liberal membership cards.

morgan

3 replies »

  1. That Ms. Clark was able to find 230 million dollars to give the top 2% an income tax reduction tells me all I need to know.

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  2. SNC Lavalin is a cancer on Canada, as their sordid tentacles have entwined both federal and provincial politicians.

    I was told up front by an RCMP Officer that in BC SNC is just off limits for an investigation unless they are “caught in the act” so to speak. The same goes with the mainstream media where any stories unfavorable to SNC are ‘killed’ by senior editors.

    As SNC own the engineering patents for the ART SkyTrain, you build SkyTrain, you get SNC.

    Judge Pittfield, the judge overseeing the Susan Heyes lawsuit against TransLink (failed in BC supreme Court), called the bidding process for the Canada Line where SNC was bidding against SNC, a “charade”. In other countries, this would be seen a a mock bidding process and illegal.

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